Paratext

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== Definition ==
 
== Definition ==
 
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Blurbs, prefaces, authorial commentary, reviews and illustrations all qualify as paratext, which is a term coined by Gerard Genette.  Part of the book and yet not part of the main narrative, paratext acts on us as readers in a way that influences how we read and interpret the main text.  An author's commentary or a powerful illustration can especially influence interpretation.
  
 
== Examples ==
 
== Examples ==

Revision as of 13:54, 11 June 2008

Paratext is a term for all added written material included in a book that does not count as the primary narrative.

Contents

Definition

Blurbs, prefaces, authorial commentary, reviews and illustrations all qualify as paratext, which is a term coined by Gerard Genette. Part of the book and yet not part of the main narrative, paratext acts on us as readers in a way that influences how we read and interpret the main text. An author's commentary or a powerful illustration can especially influence interpretation.

Examples

{give examples of the term in action}

Critical Debates

{is the term contested, challenged, defined differently, etc.?}

Related Terms

{list any terms that are related or usefully connected to this term or concept (e.g., list story under the definition of discourse)}

References

Abbot, H. Porter. The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative.

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