Discourse

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[[Category:Terms and Concepts]]
 
[[Category:Terms and Concepts]]
 
Discourse refers to spoken or written communication, typically in a formal manner.
 
Discourse refers to spoken or written communication, typically in a formal manner.
 
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== Definition ==
 
== Definition ==

Revision as of 09:28, 5 June 2008

Discourse refers to spoken or written communication, typically in a formal manner.

Contents

Definition

The term "discourse" supports a wide variety of definitions and functions, having evolved in meaning due to the modernist, structuralist, and postmodern movements (etc.). Broadly defined in terms of narratology, discourse refers to the set of principles governing how a story is told, referencing both its linguistic situation and the relationship between giver/sender/narrator of that information and its receiver/audience. Michel Foucault (Archaeology of Knowledge) played a major role in transforming the concept of discourse into a more social phenomenon, arguing for discourses as systems of thoughts or beliefs that are socially held and accepted. Discourses, in this conception, construct social "truths" and maintain them through a complex system of power relations.

Examples

{give examples of the term in action}

Critical Debates

{is the term contested, challenged, defined differently, etc.?}

Related Terms

{list any terms that are related or usefully connected to this term or concept (e.g., list story under the definition of discourse)}

References

{cite useful references or web links for further reading}
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