Diegesis

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Definition)
(Critical Debates)
Line 14: Line 14:
  
 
== Critical Debates ==
 
== Critical Debates ==
:{is the term contested, challenged, defined differently, etc.?}
+
The following are some varied ways in which "diegesis" is defined in the field of narratology:
  
 
"Diegesis summarizes events and conversations. In such a summary the voice of the narrator will always come through. He colors narrated events, which are therefore no longer directly available" (Herman and Vervaeck 14). -Luc Herman and Bart Vervaeck, Handbook of Narrative Analysis'
 
"Diegesis summarizes events and conversations. In such a summary the voice of the narrator will always come through. He colors narrated events, which are therefore no longer directly available" (Herman and Vervaeck 14). -Luc Herman and Bart Vervaeck, Handbook of Narrative Analysis'

Revision as of 12:57, 14 May 2008


Diegesis is a recounting of events in the words of a narrator.

Contents


Definition

Like mimesis, diegesis is a term explicated in the works of Plato (Ion, The Republic) and Aristotle (Poetics). The opposite of mimesis, it refers to the information related by the narrator and many times is comprised of characters thoughts and actions. This excludes dialogue, which is categorized under mimesis. In addition, diegesis can be characterized as the narrator's commentary on the thoughts and actions of characters.

Examples

{give examples of the term in action}

Critical Debates

The following are some varied ways in which "diegesis" is defined in the field of narratology:

"Diegesis summarizes events and conversations. In such a summary the voice of the narrator will always come through. He colors narrated events, which are therefore no longer directly available" (Herman and Vervaeck 14). -Luc Herman and Bart Vervaeck, Handbook of Narrative Analysis'

"Narrator describes what happened in his/her own words (or recounts what characters think and feel, without quotation)" (Martin 124). Wallace Martin, Recent Theories of Narrative

Related Terms

{list any terms that are related or usefully connected to this term or concept (e.g., list story under the definition of discourse)}

References

{cite useful references or web links for further reading}
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox