Officer Nominations

June 22nd, 2016

Dear Members of ISSN,

This October the Society will elect two new Executive Board
members, to serve for three years, as well as its next
Second Vice-President, who serves for four years
(proceeding to First Vice-President, President, and Past
President). The nominations for these positions are drawn
up by the nominating committee, which comprises the current
VP and two other Society members.

This year, that is Sarah Copland (MacEwan University), Mari
Hatavara (University of Tampere), and me (Aarhus Institute
of Advanced Studies).

All ISSN members are invited to propose names for the
nominating committee to consider. Self-nominations are
entirely in order, so don’t be shy!

Note that eligible candidates will have attended recent
ISSN conferences, and will usually commit to attending two
meetings of the ISSN Executive Board in each year of their
term – one at the ISSN Conference and one at the MLA
Convention. At the same time, don’t hesitate to nominate
someone, including yourself, who for good reason (lack of
funding, distance, etc.) cannot make it to MLA. Candidates
for Second VP should have attended 3 out of the last 5
annual conferences.

Please send your suggestions to Sarah, Mari, and me (along
with a brief indication of the reason for your
recommendation) no later than July 15, 2016.

Sarah Copland: coplands2@macewan.ca
Mari Hatavara: mari.hatavara@uta.fi
Jan Alber: janalber@aias.au.dk

All the best,
Jan Alber

2017 ISSN Conference CFP

June 14th, 2016

Call for Papers-LEON EDEL PRIZE

June 14th, 2016

The Leon Edel Prize is awarded annually for the best essay on Henry James by a beginning scholar. The prize carries with it an award of $150, and the prize-winning essay will be published in HJR.

The competition is open to applicants who have not held a full-time academic appointment for more than four years. Independent scholars and graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Essays should be 20-30 pages (including notes), original, and not under submission elsewhere or previously published.

Send electronic submissions to: hjamesr@louisville.edu

Author=s name should not appear on the manuscript. Please identify essays as submissions for the Leon Edel Prize.

A brief curriculum vitae should be included. Decisions about regular publication are also made at the same time as the prize decision.

Deadline: November 1, 2016

Extended Call for Papers- ‘Small Screen Fictions’

June 1st, 2016

Special issue of Paradoxa, ‘Small Screen Fictions’

Extended Call for Papers (anticipated publication date: December, 2017)

Editors: Astrid Ensslin (University of Alberta, Canada); Paweł Frelik (Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland); Lisa Swanstrom (Florida-Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA)

In the last few decades, digital technologies have dramatically reconfigured not only the circumstances of media production and dissemination, but also many of their cultural forms and conventions, including the roles of users, producers, authors, audiences, and readers. Arguably the most spectacular of these digital transformations have affected the large screens of cinema multiplexes and the increasingly large screens of home televisions, but other narrative forms have emerged on a smaller screens as well.
Today, with growing frequency, narratives are experienced on the smaller screens of laptops, tablets, and even mobile phones. These narratives often involve direct reader/viewer/player interaction, enabling highly idiosyncratic, individualized and unique narrative experiences. Some of these fictions are merely digitized or wikified versions of texts previously available in the codex form—their digital conversion affects some of the ways in which readers engage with them, but the basic structures of these narratives remain unchanged. Some others, however, have been written and designed (these two words often blur) specifically for these small screens. Their functionalities and affordances are not replicable in any other medial form, nor do they demonstrate an allegiance to any single pre-existing art form.
Paradoxa seeks articles for a special issue devoted to “Small Screen Fictions.” Both in-depth analyses of individual texts and more general, theoretical discussions are invited. The genres and media of interest include but are not limited to:

• DVD novels, such as Steve Tomasula’s TOC (2009);
• literary-narrative video games and ludic, gamelike fictions whose principal interest is in offering innovative storytelling experiences, such as Dear Esther(2012) and Device6 (2013);
• twitter and blog texts, such as Jennifer Egan’s “Black Box” (2012);
• collectively written, locative online texts, particularly those breaking narrative linearity, such as Hundekopf (2007), The LA Flood Project (2013) andThe Silent History (2013);
• interactive graphic novels, such as Nam Le’s The Boat (2014);
• genre-bending, dialogic hybrids, such as Blast Theory’s Karen (2015);
• neo-hypertextual fictions enabled by user-friendly authoring software such as Twine;
• physically distributed narratives that make use of small screen spaces, not merely to create and display fictions, but also to navigate, negotiate, and interact with real-world spaces through geo-caching or other means, such asIngress (2013), Cartegram (2014), and Call of the Wild (2015).

Similarly, possible approaches to such screen texts include but are not limited to:

• the changing cultural patterns and expectations of engagement with narrative;
• the reality and illusions of linearity and non-linearity;
• the shifting nature of public and private spectatorship;
• the role of touch and tactility, as well as other human senses in experiencing narratives;
• the blurring of the verbal and the visual, of fact and fiction, of reading and writing, of natural and artificial;
• the economic, social, and political contexts of authorship and readership of such texts;
• the implications of such narrative experiences for the meaning(s) and perceptions of fiction, genre and literature.

Abstracts of 500 words should be submitted by 15 August 2016 to the editors: Astrid Ensslin < ensslin@ualberta.ca>, Pawel Frelik < pawel.frelik@gmail.com> Lisa Swanstrom < swanstro@gmail.com>. Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by 30 September 2016. Full drafts (6,000 to 8,000 words) will be due by 31 December 2016.

CFP: Look Both Ways: Narrative and Metaphor in Education

June 1st, 2016

Look Both Ways: Narrative and Metaphor in Education: a Conference –  VU University, Amsterdam  to be held  30 March to 1 April 2017

Over the last 30 years, educationists have drawn increasingly on insights from philosophy, psychology, anthropology, cognitive science and linguistics to examine the roles played by narrative and metaphor in every domain of educational theory and practice. The narrative and metaphor perspectives have, however, mostly been used separately and opportunities for researchers and educators to meet and share their ideas are rare. This conference takes up the challenge of bringing educationists who have employed the narrative lens into conversation with those who have employed the metaphor lens. It highlights the work of those few researchers who have demonstrated ‘binocular vision’ (that is, employed the two perspectives in combination) in their study of education. The implications of research for teaching and policy practice will be particularly emphasized. The result should be a fuller account than has previously been attempted of the intricate relations which operate at the nexus between narrative and metaphor in and of education.

There will be 6 keynote presentations, by scholars who have undertaken outstanding work on narrative and metaphor in educational theory or practice.:
Jean Clandinin, Vera Caine & Sean Lessard – University of Alberta, Canada
Martin Cortazzi – University of Warwick & Lixian Jin – De Montfort University, UK
Kieran Egan – Simon Fraser University, Canada
Michael Hanne – University of Auckland, New Zealand
Martijn Meeter – Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Niklas Pramling – University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Questions to be explored at the conference include:

  • What specific forms do metaphor and narrative take in the educational context (ranging from learning and teaching to policy making)? How are metaphor and narrative related? Are there subject areas in which metaphor is a more effective tool for thinking and others where narrative is more useful? How may the two devices best be used in combination?
  • How do educational practitioners use metaphor and narrative as strategies in teaching or learning? In what special ways may narrative and metaphor be employed in, e.g. teacher training, counselling, and the education of learners with special needs?
  • There has been much research on how shifts in metaphor may change our thinking. How can learners and other educational practitioners become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of using metaphor? Do we need to be equally aware of the importance of shifts in narrative?
  • How are questions of e.g. agency and power both highlighted and occluded by the narratives and metaphors most commonly used in contemporary educational discourse?
  • What particular narrative and metaphor issues arise around educational theory and practice in different cultures, including developing countries?
  • Has the introduction of digital technology influenced the way in which teachers and learners employ narrative and metaphor?
  • There has been much concern about how metaphors of ‘accounting’ and ‘the market’ have come to dominate contemporary policy discourse in education. How might fresh metaphor perspectives cause us to view the challenges in education differently, and how might fresh narrative perspectives assist us to envisage fresh solutions?
  • How are narrative and metaphor employed as research tools within the educational context?

Proposals for interactive paper sessions, posters and 75-minute workshops (with an applied focus) are invited from scholars and practitioners in every field of education. Presentations employing innovative or creative formats are particularly welcome and submissions by practising teachers are invited. Submission deadline: 14 October 2016

Registration: 1 October 2016 – 17 February 2017.

 

For further details, see the conference website at:https://named2017conference.com/

The conference will be organized from the Vrije Universiteit teacher training institute (at the Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences) in Amsterdam by a team of education, narrative and metaphor specialists and in collaboration with Metaphor Lab Amsterdam. It
 is the fourth in a series on the role of narrative and metaphor in different disciplines. The first, relating to medicine, was held at UC Berkeley in 2010. The second, relating to politics, was held at Claremont Graduate University in 2012. The third, relating to law, was held at Stanford Law School in early 2016.

CFP for RSA 2017 Chicago: Early Modern Prose Fiction-Popular Literary Art

May 12th, 2016
CFP: Early Modern Prose Fiction-Popular Literary Art
 
Although the last two decades have seen the publication of important studies on early modern prose fiction, the studied texts themselves remain marginal presences in scholarly narratives of early modern literature. More often than not, these texts are invoked for their relation to better-known dramatic texts, for the light they shed on topical events or discourses or for their contribution to the emergence of the novel. Studies discussing early modern prose fiction from a literary aesthetic perspective are comparatively rare despite – or precisely because of – the immense popularity and wide circulation of such texts at the time. This panel seeks to explore this tension between popularity and literariness and invites papers that focus on aesthetic aspects of early modern prose fiction, such as for instance
 
* stylistic features
* rhetoric strategies
* negotiation of literary trends
* metafictional and/or meta-poetic aspects
* literary affiliation
* generic hybridity and/or innovation
* interventions in discourses on poetics
* etc.
 
Submit abstracts for papers by Friday, 27 May to Rahel Orgis, University of Neuchâtel, rahel.orgis@unine.ch. Abstracts should be no longer than 150 words, headed by a title (15 words maximum) and accompanied by key words and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum; no prose bio).

Call for Papers for the Second Historical Fictions Research Conference

May 10th, 2016
Call for Papers for the Second Historical Fictions Research Conference

Dates: February 24th and 25th 2017

Location: National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, United Kingdom.

Conference Cultural Collaborator: National Maritime Museum.

Website:https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/conference-2017/
Twitter: @HistoricalFic
Facebook Group: Historical Fictions Research Network

We aim to create a disciplinary core, where researchers can engage in issues of philosophy and methodology and generate a collective discourse around historical fictions in a range of media and across period specialities.

Paper proposals consisting of a title and abstract of no more than 250 words should be submitted to:

historicalfictionsresearch@gmail.com

By September 1st 2016

(NB: the organisers will be checking email once a week).

Keynote speakers:

Michael Twitty, Explorer of the Culinary Traditions of Africa, African America and the African Diaspora @KosherSoul and http://afroculinaria.com/

Virginia Preston, Kings College, London, is deputy director of the Institute of British History and a specialist in the social history of the navy. She has also written on the fictional naval family, the Marlows.

Inshore Squadron: a re-eneactment group who specialise in recreating the movements of historic naval battles from the Age of Sail and presenting them using computers and models of the ships at conferences and public events.

Registration Fee: £60

Students/Unemployed: £10
Historical fictions can be understood as an expanded mode of historiography. Scholars in literary, visual, historical and museum/re-creation studies have long been interested in the construction of the fictive past, understanding it as a locus for ideological expression. However, this is a key moment for the study of historical fictions as critical recognition of these texts and their convergence with lines of theory is expanding into new areas such as the philosophy of history, narratology, popular literature, historical narratives of national and cultural identity, and cross-disciplinary approaches to narrative constructions of the past.

Historical fictions measure the gap between the pasts we are permitted to know and those we wish to know: the interaction of the meaning-making narrative drive with the narrative-resistant nature of the past. They constitute a powerful discursive system for the production of cognitive and ideological representations of identity, agency, and social function, and for the negotiation of conceptual relationships and charged tensions between the complexity of societies in time and the teleology of lived experience. The licences of fiction, especially in mass culture, define a space of thought in which the pursuit of narrative forms of meaning is permitted to slip the chains of sanctioned historical truths to explore the deep desires and dreams that lie beneath all constructions of the past.

We welcome paper proposals from Archaeology, Architecture, Literature, Media, Art History, Musicology, Reception Studies, Museum Studies, Recreation, Gaming, Transformative Works and others. We welcome paper proposals across historical periods, with ambitious, high-quality, inter-disciplinary approaches and new methodologies that will support research into larger trends and which will lead to more theoretically informed understandings of the mode across historical periods, cultures and languages.

You can find a list of last year’s papers here:https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/conference/programme-for-2016-conference/

CFP: “Cognitive Approaches to Comparative Literature”

April 29th, 2016

“Cognitive Approaches to Comparative Literature” is the first online conference to be hosted on the MLA Commons platform. It will run from April 5-28, 2017. Twelve presentations (3000 words each) will be posted here on April 5th and then will be open for discussion by members of the Commons. The authors are expected to respond to the questions/comments through April 28th. Please submit a 750-word abstract accompanied by a 200-word bio to Lisa Zunshine by September 10, 2016. Particularly welcome are papers theorizing the relationship between the comparative and the cognitive and/or dealing with literatures other than English.

CFP: Style and Response: Minds, Media, Methods

April 22nd, 2016

The CFP for an upcoming conference, Style and Response: Minds, Media, Methods, has been extended until Friday 27th May 2016.

Style and Response aims to share and debate reader-response methods and thus investigate how real readers, players, audiences, and viewers respond to, experience, and interpret texts. In particular, this interdisciplinary symposium will focus on topics such as: the style in which readers respond to a variety of narrative forms (e.g. fiction, poetry, theatre, digital narratives, computer games, film and TV, news broadcasts, political discourse, and other non-fiction including health publications); the methods that we can use to capture and analyse those responses; the ways in which those responses can be used in the analyses of texts across a variety of media.

 

The conference will take place on Friday 11th and Saturday 12th November 2016 at Sheffield Hallam University (UK) with the following keynote speakers:

 

Dr. Ranjana Das, University of Leicester.

Prof. Melanie Green, University of Buffalo.

Dr. David Peplow, Sheffield Hallam University and Dr. Sara Whiteley, University of Sheffield.

Dr. Bronwen Thomas, Bournemouth University.

For more information about the conference including how to submit an abstract, please visit the conference website: https://blogs.shu.ac.uk/styleandresponse/

Style and Response: Minds, Media, Methods is hosted by the Stylistics Research Group at Sheffield Hallam University and sponsored by Sheffield Hallam University’s Humanities Research Centre and the international Poetics and Linguistics Association (PALA).

CFP: Consuming Gender

April 22nd, 2016

Call for Papers: ‘Consuming Gender’

 

This special issue of Assuming Gender – an online, peer-reviewed academic journal from Cardiff University – seeks to explore the way gender is both presented and consumed through popular media and advertising. As Ann Herrmann points out in the article ‘Shopping for Identities’, commodities ‘are characterised by their dual nature: material composition and symbolic meaning’ (Herrmann 2002: 539). Consumer culture plays a significant role in constructing valid (and normative) identity categories with which consumers are encouraged to identify.

 

Scholars as diverse as Americus Reed, Laura C. Nelson, and Henry Jenkins have theorised the ways in which identity and consumer culture are intertwined. Reed, for example, claims in ‘Activating the Self-Importance of Consumer Selves’ that ‘[s]ocial identities are mental representations that can become a basic part of how consumers view themselves’ (Reed 2004: 286). In a later article on ‘Identity-Based Consumer Behaviour’, Reed and others use the example of athletics to illustrate their point: ‘if consumers view themselves as “athletes”, they are likely to behave in ways that are consistent with what it means to “be” an athlete’ (Reed, Forehand, Puntoni and Warlop 2002: 310). Consumption thus becomes defined by identity, and identity becomes defined by consumption.

 

While the construction of identities based on athleticism seems relatively benign, the case quickly becomes more complicated when consumer identities are racially, economically, or sexually coded. In addition to delineating the borders between various interest groups, consumer culture plays a significant role in establishing and maintaining binary identity distinctions (male/female, gay/straight, black/white), undermining the validity of those identifying across or in-between one or more categories, or who refuse categorisation at all. Those identities not classified as valid consumer groups are not seen as valid identities at all.

 

For this special issue of Assuming Gender, we invite articles that focus specifically on the idea of ‘Consuming Gender’. How has consumer culture constructed (and how has it been constructed by) gender through the ages?

 

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Consuming gender/gendered consumption
  • Historical contexts of gendered consumption
  • Feminist/postfeminist approaches to consumption
  • Consumption and intersectionality
  • Queer consumption
  • Media constructions of (gendered) consumer identities
  • Post/colonialism and gendered consumption

 

Please send a proposal of roughly 500 words to Megen de Bruin-Molé, Akira Suwa and Daný van Dam at gender@cardiff.ac.uk under the subject line ‘CFP Consuming Gender’, including your name, e-mail institutional affiliation (if any), and a biographical note (100 words maximum). We welcome papers from scholars of all backgrounds, disciplines, and career stages. The deadline for proposals is 16 October, 2016, and completed papers of 5000 to 8000 words will be expected no later than 16 April, 2017.

 

Assuming Gender is an electronic journal dedicated to the timely analysis of constructions of gendered texts, practices, and subjectivities. This journal seeks to continue and shift debates on how gender is problematized in contemporary discourses as well as participate in the dialogue and tensions that maintain the urgency of such conversations. Prior issues can be viewed on www.assuminggender.com.