Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

Call for proposals (reprise): 2017 MLA Panel

Monday, August 31st, 2015

The ISSN Program Committee (Frederick Aldama, Liesbeth Korthals Altes, and Jan Alber) invites proposals for the Society’s guaranteed session at the 2017 MLA, scheduled for 5–8 January in Philadelphia. A topic may be proposed by any current member(s) of ISSN, who would also chair or co-chair the chosen panel. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of MLA. Proposals for the ISSN session at MLA 2017 should include a session title and a brief rationale not to exceed one page.

Please submit your proposal to Jan Alber (janalber@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de) by November 1, 2015. The Program Committee will announce its selection by December 1, 2015.

Call for proposals: 2017 MLA Panel

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

The ISSN Program Committee (Frederick Aldama, Liesbeth Korthals Altes, and Jan Alber) invites proposals for the Society’s guaranteed session at the 2017 MLA, scheduled for 5–8 January in Philadelphia. A topic may be proposed by any current member(s) of ISSN, who would also chair or co-chair the chosen panel.
Participation on the panel will be open to all members of MLA. Proposals for the ISSN session at MLA 2017 should include a session title and a brief rationale not to exceed one page.

Please submit your proposal to Jan Alber (jan.alber@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de) by November 1, 2015.

The Program Committee will announce its selection by December 1, 2015.

Narrative 2015 – Best Student Essay

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Dear all,

The deadline for this year’s Best Graduate Student Essay presented at the 2015 Narrative Conference is April 1. Please submit!

All graduate students who present papers at the conference are invited to compete for the prize for the best graduate student essay. The winner will receive a copy of a Perkins Prize-winning book of his or her choice and will be encouraged to expand the winning paper for consideration by Narrative. In addition, the 2015 award winner will be eligible for $500 toward expenses to attend the 2016 conference. Submit papers electronically as attachments (Word or PDF) to both of the judges: Amy Elias (aelias2@utk.eduand Sue J. Kim (sue_kim@uml.edu). Papers must be received by April 1, 2015. Papers must be unrevised conference presentations. While formatting changes, correction of typos, and the addition of a Works Cited page are acceptable, changes to the substance of the argument are not.

Best,

Sue & Amy

MLA 2016 Panels and CFPs

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

Colleagues,

The MLA panel committee (Kurt Koenigsberger, Erin McGlothlin, Brian McHale) are pleased to announce the panels that the ISSN is proposing for the 2016 MLA in Austin, TX.  You’ll find calls-for-papers for both panels attached.  The first of these panels, proposed by Rita Charon (Columbia) and Patrick Donal (University of Iowa), is guaranteed; the other, developed in collaboration with the Goethe Society, requires approval by the MLA’s program committee.

 

Shorter versions of these cfp’s (Rita called them the “haiku version”) will appear in the upcoming MLA bulletin, but we thought you would want to get an early peek at the full-dress versions.  You are invited to submit paper proposals to the panel organizers, whose addresses you’ll find at the bottom of the cfp’s.

 

All the best,
Brian

Narrative Medicine, the Body, and Justice

ISSN Guaranteed Panel, MLA 2016, Austin TX 7-10 January

 

Recent work in autobiographical theory, testimony/trauma work, and embodiment studies by Susan Brison, John Paul Eakin, and Dori Laub, among others, contests the proposal, made by Elaine Scarry long ago, that there exists no language for pain. Instead, we see more and more clearly that there are potent means of transducing pain and other bodily states into language or its congeners in visual and aural media. Spoken word performances by kids with cerebral palsy, pianist Fred Hersch’s concert “My Coma Dreams” that tells in jazz of his near-death by AIDS, or accounts of traumas of war, genocide, and sexual violence testify to a perhaps increasing power to represent pain, mortality, and differently abled states in ways that can be communicated first to self and then to others. Such tellings do work in the world for the individuals who tell and listen as well as for the wider surround. With a potential to contribute not only to individual recovery but also toward social justice goals, these practices can also pose risks of exposure, distortion, misplaced trust, and ultimately exploitation.

Narrative Medicine and its relatives in the medical or health humanities arose to fortify the capacity of those who work in health care to hear what patients say. Maturing from an initial naïve stance that supposed that altruism alone was sufficient for clinicians to improve their listening practice, these cross-cutting disciplines are now well-positioned to critically examine the complexities of late modern narrative ethics, mind/brain cognitive processes surrounding corporeality and emotion, the poetics of the telling of the self in pain, and the always primary considerations of social justice in these accounts. Increasingly, the foci of study transcend individual clinical instances to investigate meta-situations of violence and pain in the banal, cultural memory and post-memory, and state and institutionalized violence.

Up to now, Narrative Medicine has largely focused on using interpretive methods and theoretical understandings from the humanities, especially the study of narrative as such, to critically examine these complexities in the body, the clinic, and the world. However, adapting practices to new contexts necessarily broadens and deepens theory. Attending to narrative practice among clinicians and witnesses will change how we approach narrative literature, film and performance, completing a recursive loop.

This panel aims to expose some of the controversies and promising veins of thought in this terrain. Papers of interest will explode the periphery of these fields to identify that which lies beyond the easily tellable. Papers might take up some of the following topics:

 

  1. How to contend with the nonrepresentational material (thingness) of bodies while recognizing that their representations create the real
  2. The roles of creativity in the representation of bodily states
  3. The core of doubt in any spoken or inscribed representation of the mortal state
  4. Genres particularly suited to contemporary expression of erstwhile untellable tales of violence and pain
  5. The effect of theorizing/interpreting genres expressing the untellable on theorizing/interpreting literary genres
  6. Cognitive or cultural aspects of how one might be “programmed” to tell of pain and how another might be programmed to understand that account as meaningful or not
  7. Aspects of narrative ethics that illuminate global responsibilities toward instances of state violence or terror

 

MLA/ISSN panel submitted by Rita Charon, Columbia University, New York, NY rac5@columbia.edu and Patrick A Dolan Jr., University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA patrick-dolan@uiowa

 


 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Narratologist?

 

Collaborative Session:  International Society for the Study of Narrative and the Goethe Society of North America

Modern Languages Association Annual Convention Austin, Texas 7-10 January, 2016

 

Although constituting an innovative and influential narrative corpus, the prose works of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe are not often invoked in either the core texts of classical narratology or in contemporary narrative theory.  According to Martin Swales, however, Goethe maintained a life-long interest narrativity that significantly shaped his narrative practice.  The inattention to Goethe’s work on the part of narrative theorists thus represents a significant oversight. We invite papers to consider how narrative theory can illuminate Goethe’s prose works—in particular his four novelistic masterworks Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (1774, The Sorrows of Young Werther), Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre (1795-1796, Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship), Die Wahlverwandschaften (1809, Elective Affinities), and Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre (1821/1839, Wilhelm Meister’s Journeyman Years).  We also wish to explore the ways in which Goethe’s narrative work enacts its own particular narrative theory.  Possible presentations might address the following questions:  How can narrative theory be productively deployed in analyses of Goethe’s works?  How does an examination of his works help us to better understand the narrative conventions of the novel as they developed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, whether in the context of German-language literature or transnationally/translinguistically?  How do his prose works invite or resist narratologically inflected readings?  How can insights into the narrative dynamics of Goethe’s texts enrich existing narratological paradigms?  We invite papers that either narrow in on particular narrative theoretical aspects of Goethe’s works or broaden their focus to consider Goethe’s narratives alongside the work of other writers.

 

1-page abstracts to mcglothlin@wustl.edu and kschutjer@ou.edu by 1 March 2015

Call for Proposals (Reprise): 2016 MLA Panel

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

The ISSN Program Committee (Kurt Koenigsberger, Erin McGlothlin, Brian McHale) invites proposals for the Society’s guaranteed session at the 2016 MLA, scheduled for January 4-7 in Austin, Texas.  A topic may be proposed by any current member(s) of ISSN, who would also chair or co-chair the chosen panel.   Participation on the panel will be open to all members of MLA.  Proposals for the ISSN session at MLA 2016 should include a session title and a brief rationale not to exceed one page. Please submit your proposal to Brian McHale (mchale.11@osu.edu) by November 1, 2014.  The Program Committee will announce its selection by December 1, 2014.

Call for Papers: Modelling Narrative Across Borders

Monday, July 7th, 2014

** CALL FOR PAPERS **

The 4th Conference of the European Narratology Network (ENN)
Modelling Narrative across Borders
April 16 to 18, 2015
Ghent University, Belgium
http://www.enn4.ugent.be

Keynote speakers:
Thomas Pavel (University of Chicago)
Monika Fludernik (University of Freiburg)
Elena Semino (Lancaster University)
David Herman (Durham University)

Pre-Conference Doctoral Master Class
April 14 and 15, 2015
Confirmed speaker: Jan Christoph Meister (University of Hamburg)

Modelling Narrative across Borders

Narratologists are increasingly faced with the situation that the concept of narrative varies widely across borders. This is a happy circumstance for the relevance and vitality of narratological concepts. At the same time, however, this situation means that any easy “lateral compatibility” of concepts such as “narrator,” “(un)reliability,” “focalization,” etc. can no longer be taken for granted. Concepts have a different bearing across different media such as the printed book, film or the digital media. Carrying on with the debates that got underway at the 2013 Paris conference, ENN 4 will address these issues by exploring conceptual models and inputs from various disciplines and methodologies such as rhetoric and stylistics, but also more recent developments including the cognitive sciences, media studies, the digital humanities and many more. In doing so, the ENN aims to act as an on-going forum for discussing narrative theory across borders – conceptual, disciplinary, national, cultural, historical.

Paper submission and selection procedure

Deadline for submission of panels: September 1, 2014
Deadline for submission of proposed papers or posters (200 words): October 1, 2014

  • Abstracts should contain title, author’s name and affiliation and an outline proposing a theoretical .
  • Pre-organized panels for consideration should additionally contain

– a summary paragraph along with proposed session title
– name of a panel chair (this may be one of the speakers)
– max 3 or 4 papers per panel

  • For a poster, please submit a 200-word abstract and a CV. There will be separate poster sessions.

Send submissions to the conference organisation committee via enn4@ugent.be (please write “ENN Conference: Submission” in the subject line.)

Acceptances will be sent out on November 15, 2014
Registration for the Conference will open on November 15, 2014
Deadline for registration: January 10, 2015
Registration fee: 165 € – Students: 85 €

In order to present a paper at the conference, participants must be members of the ENN.
To register as a member, please consult the ENN website – “How to join the ENN”
http://www.narratology.net/join-ENN

The official languages of the Conference are English, French and German.
The Pre-conference and Conference will take place at Ghent University, Belgium.

Pre-Conference Doctoral Seminar – April 14 and 15, 2015

In conjunction with the 4th Conference of the European Narratology Network, a new pre-conference doctoral seminar on interdisciplinary narrative theory will be offered. The seminar will feature as confirmed speaker Professor Jan Christoph Meister (Hamburg University). The master class will be devoted partly to the theoretical discussion of narratological parameters and partly to the application of these parameters to (automated) narrative analysis. It will involve a hands-on introduction to tools for computational narratology and collaborative narratological annotation (in cooperation with the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities @GhentCDH).

Applicants for participation in the seminar (who must be enrolled as doctoral students in a degree-granting institution during the 2014-2015 academic year) doing research on any topic of narrative in any medium are eligible.
Prospective participants are asked to send a 2- to 3-page description of their doctoral research together with their résumés and name of institution to the following address: enn4@ugent.be. Please write “ENN Conference: Master Class” in the subject line. The deadline for submissions is October 1, 2014.

Ph.D. students completing the course will receive a diploma. The course counts as 2 ECTS.
Price: The course is free of charge, but participants will need to pay the (student) conference registration fee to

Further information and links

Inquiries concerning the conference can be sent to enn4@ugent.be

Main conference convenor: Prof. Gunther Martens (Ghent University).

For more information, visit the conference website (under construction):

http://www.enn4.ugent.be

Check back soon for additional information concerning accommodation etc.

Social media links
http://www.facebook.com/Narratology
http://www.twitter.com/ENN_Europe

Hashtag
#ENN4
Feel free to spread this CFP via the link http://www.enn4.ugent.be/CFP

ISSN MLA Proposals

Friday, June 13th, 2014

The ISSN Program Committee (Kurt Koenigsberger, Erin McGlothlin, Brian McHale) invites proposals for the Society’s guaranteed session at the 2016 MLA, scheduled for January 4-7 in Austin, Texas. A topic may be proposed by any current member(s) of ISSN, who would also chair or co-chair the chosen panel. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of MLA. Proposals for the ISSN session at MLA 2016 should include a session title and a brief rationale not to exceed one page. Please submit your proposal to Brian McHale (mchale.11@osu.edu) by November 1, 2014. The Program Committee will announce its selection by December 1, 2014.

ISSN Panels for MLA Chicago, January 2014

Friday, October 11th, 2013

 

Thursday, 9 January

Session 103. Narrative Empathy for the Other

3:30–4:45 p.m.

Program arranged by the International Society for the Study of Narrative

Presiding: Patrick Horn, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

 

1. “Narrative Empathy as Acknowledgment,” Ann Jurecic, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

2. “Narrative Strategies for Developing Cross-Racial and Cross-Cultural Empathy in the Short Fiction of Sandra Cisneros and Jhumpa Lahiri,” Marilyn Edelstein, Santa Clara Univ.

3. “Real ‘Others’: Pathways for Empathy in Autobiographical Narrative,” Leah M. Anderst, Queensborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York

 

Saturday, 11 January

Session 594. What Makes a Modernist Plot? Modernism and Narrative Innovation

3:30–4:45 p.m.

Program arranged by the International Society for the Study of Narrative and the Modernist Studies Association

Presiding: Richard Walsh, Univ. of York

1. “Endless Plot: Modernism’s Sequel Problem,” Matthew Levay, Harvard Univ.

2. “The Art of Biography and the Form of Modernist Fiction,” Nathaniel Cadle, Florida International Univ.

3. “Virginia Woolf and Plots Driven by Feelings,” Marta Figlerowicz, Univ. of California, Berkeley

3rd Conference of the European Narratology Network – Paris, March 29-30, 2013

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Call for papers:

3rd Conference of the European Narratology Network – Paris, March 29-30, 2013

Pre-Conference Doctoral Seminar – March 27-28, 2013

Deadline for proposals: October 15, 2012

For full information:

http://www.narratology.net/sites/www.narratology.net/files/webfm/Call%20for%20Papers_final.pdf

ENN website: http://www.narratology.net

2012 Best Graduate Student Essay @ Narrative Conference

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

All graduate students who present papers at the conference are invited to compete for the prize
for the best graduate student paper. The winner will receive a copy of a Perkins Prize-winning book
of his or her choice and will be encouraged to expand the winning paper for consideration by
Narrative. In addition, the 2012 award winner will be eligible for $500 toward expenses to attend the
2013 conference. Submit papers electronically as attachments (Word PC-compatible files) to both of
the judges, Kurt Koenigsberger <kurt.koenigsberger@case.edu> and Erin McGlothlin <emcgloth@
artsci.wustl.edu>. Papers should be sent to them by Monday, April 30, 2012. Papers must be
unrevised conference presentations.