Inviting submissions for the 2018 Perkins Prize

March 5th, 2017

Established in 1994, the Perkins Prize honors Barbara Perkins and George Perkins, the founders of both The Journal of Narrative Technique and the Society itself. The prize, awarded to the book making the most significant contribution to the study of narrative in a given year, consists of $1,000 plus a contribution of $500 toward expenses for the winning author to attend the Narrative Conference where the award will be presented.

The Perkins Prize is conceived as a book prize rather than an author prize. Thus all books on the topic of narrative, whether edited collections, collaboratively written books, or monographs, are eligible to compete. If an edited collection or collaboratively written book is selected, the prize goes to the editor(s) or the collaborators. The winner of the competition for books published in 2016 will be announced at the New York MLA Convention in January 2018, and the prize will be presented at the Narrative Conference in Montréal, Québec, in April 2018.

To nominate books with a copyright date of 2016, please send an email with “Perkins Prize” in the subject line to The Chair of the judging committee:

Brian McHale mchale.11@osu.edu

Publisher, third-party, and self-nominations are all appropriate.  Copies of books must be sent to each of the three judges. Please indicate in the nominating email whether the publisher or the author will send the books. The deadline for nominations and for receipt of books by the judges is June 1, 2017.

Books should be sent by authors or their publishers directly to each of the three members of the judging committee:

Brian McHale
Department of English
The Ohio State University
421 Denney Hall
164 Annie and John Glenn Ave.
Columbus OH 43210
 
Porter Abbott
7271 Gills Pier Rd.
Northport, MI  49670
 
Sue J. Kim
Department of English
UMass Lowell
O’Leary Library 476
61 Wilder Street
Lowell, MA 01854

CFP Deadline Extended: Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography

December 1st, 2016

CFP Deadline Extended: Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography
New Proposal Deadline: December 20th.

“The Emily Dickinson International Society and the International Society for the Study of Narrative invite papers for a proposed special session entitled “Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography,” at the 2018 MLA conference in New York, scheduled for January 4-7. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of the MLA.

Narrative theory’s attention to plot, traditionally, has been more concerned with the temporal than with the spatial—more with sequences of events than their spaces. However, contemporary narratology’s “spatial turn” evinces an increasing concern for space, place, and geography. Recent developments in narrative theory direct our attention to a second meaning of “plot,” offered by the Oxford English Dictionary, where “plot” refers to “A fairly small piece of ground, esp. one used for a specified purpose, such as a building or gardening,” a definition that invites reflection on the intersection of narrative and space in ways that might usefully illuminate the study of both.

In June 1869, Emily Dickinson famously wrote to T. W. Higginson, “I do not cross my Father’s ground to any House or town” (L 330), then cultivated her “solitary Acre –” (Fr. 778) as a rhizomatic locality from which her imagination radiated. In poems and letters, as well as in her herbarium, Dickinson recurrently probed the intersecting zones of house, garden, and world. Revolving, on the one hand, around the particular experiences, memories, and artifacts attaching a life to a place, her writings seem, on the other hand, to call forth a vision of the world—this “Apocalypse of Green –” (Fr. 1356)—as a network or ecology of chaotically circulating voices and elements, a place where we cannot get our bearings. Following the spatial turn in Dickinson, mapping the immersive environments evoked in her writings, as well as reading her poems and letters as environments encourages the production of new, layered narratives—“plots”—broadly concerned with Dickinson’s relation to geography, cartography, memory, and genre.

Possible paper topics include the relationship between memory, space, and narrative; the dynamic between what Christine Gerhardt calls “near and far geographies”; and the poetics of cartography. More specific inquires into Dickinson's green narratives—her botanical imagination, her poetry of the garden, and, beyond it, the land- and sound- scapes—as well as narratives exploring the recent archaeological excavation and reconstruction of the garden site at the Dickinson Homestead are also welcome.

Proposals should be no more than 300 words, and include a title and a brief biographical note. Please submit your proposal to Dan Punday (dpunday@english.msstate.edu) and Marta Werner (wernerm@dyc.edu) by December 20th. Any questions can be directed to Dan Punday at dpunday@english.msstate.edu.”

2017 Booth Lifetime Achievement Award

December 1st, 2016

From President Brian McHale:

“On behalf of the Executive Committee of the International Society for the Study of Narrative, I am delighted to be able to announce that the winner of the 2017 Booth Lifetime Achievement Award is the distinguished narrative theorist and independent scholar, Marie-Laure Ryan.  She will be receiving her award during the Awards Luncheon at the 2017 annual conference at the University of Kentucky, 25 March 2017, and will be honored with a special panel devoted to her work and career.

For a brief bio-bibliographic note on Marie-Laure Ryan, please see the link below.
Please join the Executive Committee in congratulating our colleague Marie-Laure Ryan.”

Perkins Prize Winner 2017

November 7th, 2016

Award Announcement from the Vice-President of ISSN, Jan Alber:

“As Chair of this year’s Perkins Prize committee, I now have the pleasure of announcing the winner.

The Perkins Prize for the book making the most significant contribution to the study of narrative in 2015 goes to:

Erin James, for The Storyworld Accord: Econarratology and Postcolonial Narratives (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press).

And an Honorable Mention goes to:

Robyn Warhol and Susan S. Lanser (eds.), for Narrative Theory Unbound: Queer and Feminist Interventions (Columbus: The Ohio State University Press).

Congratulations for these excellent books. The citations will be read at the Narrative conference in Lexington, KY, in March 2017.

The Perkins Prize was established in honor of “the many past and continuing contributions of Barbara Perkins and George Perkins to the development and success of the Society, including the founding of both The Journal of Narrative Technique and the Society itself.” The award consists of a prize of $1000 plus a contribution of $500 toward expenses for the winning author to attend the Narrative Conference, where the award is presented.

My thanks to the other members of the prize committee this year, Alice Bell and Thomas Pavel, for their scrupulous work.

Best,
Jan”

ISSN 2016 Election Results

November 3rd, 2016
The ISSN membership has elected Maria Mäkelä of the University of Tampere as Second Vice-President, and Per Krogh Hansen of the University of Southern Denmark and Tara MacDonald of the University of Idaho as members of the Executive Council.  Please join me in congratulating Maria, per, and Tara in and thanking them in advance for the valuable work they’ll do on behalf of the Society over the next several years.
Please also join me in thanking our other excellent candidates for their willingness to serve: Nancy Pedri, Marco Caracciolo, and Catherine Romagnolo.

CFP: Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography

November 3rd, 2016
Proposals Due: December 1st
“The Emily Dickinson International Society and the International Society for the Study of Narrative invite papers for a proposed special session entitled “Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography,” at the 2018 MLA conference in New York, scheduled for January 4-7. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of the MLA.
 
Narrative theory’s attention to plot, traditionally, has been more concerned with the temporal than with the spatial—more with sequences of events than their spaces. However, contemporary narratology’s “spatial turn” evinces an increasing concern for space, place, and geography. Recent developments in narrative theory direct our attention to a second meaning of “plot,” offered by the Oxford English Dictionary, where “plot” refers to “A fairly small piece of ground, esp. one used for a specified purpose, such as a building or gardening,” a definition that invites reflection on the intersection of narrative and space in ways that might usefully illuminate the study of both.
 
In June 1869, Emily Dickinson famously wrote to T. W. Higginson, “I do not cross my Father’s ground to any House or town” (L 330), then cultivated her “solitary Acre –” (Fr. 778) as a rhizomatic locality from which her imagination radiated. In poems and letters, as well as in her herbarium, Dickinson recurrently probed the intersecting zones of house, garden, and world. Revolving, on the one hand, around the particular experiences, memories, and artifacts attaching a life to a place, her writings seem, on the other hand, to call forth a vision of the world—this “Apocalypse of Green –” (Fr. 1356)—as a network or ecology of chaotically circulating voices and elements, a place where we cannot get our bearings. Following the spatial turn in Dickinson, mapping the immersive environments evoked in her writings, as well as reading her poems and letters as environments encourages the production of new, layered narratives—“plots”—broadly concerned with Dickinson’s relation to geography, cartography, memory, and genre.
 
Possible paper topics include the relationship between memory, space, and narrative; the dynamic between what Christine Gerhardt calls “near and far geographies”; and the poetics of cartography. More specific inquires into Dickinson’s green narratives—her botanical imagination, her poetry of the garden, and, beyond it, the land- and sound-scapes—as well as narratives exploring the recent archaeological excavation and reconstruction of the garden site at the Dickinson Homestead are also welcome.
 
Proposals should be no more than 300 words, and include a title and a brief biographical note. Please submit your proposal to Dan Punday (dpunday@english.msstate.edu) and Marta Werner (wernerm@dyc.edu) by Dec. 1, 2016.”

CFP for MLA 2018

October 24th, 2016

Reminder: CFP for MLA 2018
Proposals Due Nov. 1
“The ISSN Program Committee (Dan Punday, Paul Wake, Kay Young) would like to remind you that we’re just about a week away from the deadline to submit a proposal for the Society’s guaranteed session at the 2018 MLA, scheduled for January 4-7 in New York City.

A topic may be proposed by any current member(s) of ISSN, who would also chair or co-chair the chosen panel. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of MLA. Proposals for the ISSN session at MLA 2018 should include a session title and a brief rationale not to exceed one page.

Please submit your proposal to Dan Punday (dpunday@english.msstate.edu) by November 1, 2016. The Program Committee will announce its selection by December 1, 2016.”

REMINDER: Narrative Conference CFP

October 11th, 2016

REMINDER

Deadline this Week

Narrative Conference

Lexington, Kentucky

March 23-26, 2017

Submission Deadline: October 15

CFP Narrative 2017

                 (Submissions accepted through Monday morning.)

CFP Narrative 2017

CFP: Dickinson and Narrative Cartographies

October 6th, 2016

Call for Papers:
Proposal Due: December 1st
“The Emily Dickinson International Society and the International Society for the Study of Narrative invite papers for a proposed special session entitled “Emily Dickinson’s Narrative Cartography,” at the 2018 MLA conference in New York, scheduled for January 4-7. Participation on the panel will be open to all members of the MLA.

Narrative theory’s attention to plot, traditionally, has been more concerned with the temporal than with the spatial—more with sequences of events than their spaces. However, contemporary narratology’s “spatial turn” evinces an increasing concern for space, place, and geography. Recent developments in narrative theory direct our attention to a second meaning of “plot,” offered by the Oxford English Dictionary, where “plot” refers to “A fairly small piece of ground, esp. one used for a specified purpose, such as a building or gardening,” a definition that invites reflection on the intersection of narrative and space in ways that might usefully illuminate the study of both.

In June 1869, Emily Dickinson famously wrote to T. W. Higginson, “I do not cross my Father’s ground to any House or town” (L 330), then cultivated her “solitary Acre –” (Fr. 778) as a rhizomatic locality from which her imagination radiated. In poems and letters, as well as in her herbarium, Dickinson recurrently probed the intersecting zones of house, garden, and world. Revolving, on the one hand, around the particular experiences, memories, and artifacts attaching a life to a place, her writings seem, on the other hand, to call forth a vision of the world—this “Apocalypse of Green –” (Fr. 1356)—as a network or ecology of chaotically circulating voices and elements, a place where we cannot get our bearings. Following the spatial turn in Dickinson, mapping the immersive environments evoked in her writings, as well as reading her poems and letters as environments encourages the production of new, layered narratives—“plots”—broadly concerned with Dickinson’s relation to geography, cartography, memory, and genre.

Possible paper topics include the relationship between memory, space, and narrative; the dynamic between what Christine Gerhardt calls “near and far geographies”; and the poetics of cartography. More specific inquires into Dickinson’s green narratives—her botanical imagination, her poetry of the garden, and, beyond it, the land- and sound-scapes—as well as narratives exploring the recent archaeological excavation and reconstruction of the garden site at the Dickinson Homestead are also welcome.

Proposals should be no more than 300 words, and include a title and a brief biographical note. Please submit your proposal to Dan Punday (dpunday@english.msstate.edu) and Marta Werner (wernerm@dyc.edu) by Dec. 1, 2016.”

CFP: Geographical Narratology

September 27th, 2016

Call For Papers:
Geographical Narratology
Abstracts Due: October 1st

“In the past twenty or thirty years narratology has diversified into narratologies and we now commonly speak of cognitive narratology, for example, unnatural narratology, socionarratology, and historical narratology. Yet, despite the spatial turn that began to occur some time ago in the humanities and humanistic social sciences and despite the large amount of recent work on the inscription of (literary) texts in space and on the representation of space in (literary) texts, there has been no real attempt to develop a geographical narratology focused on examining the links between geography and narrative forms or traits.
A special number of Frontiers of Narrative Studies, to be published in 2018, will be devoted to the exploration of the program such a narratology might follow and will welcome, in particular, papers studying the (possible) links between geography and specific narrative features (e.g. free indirect discourse, external focalization, or anterior narration) and (possible) new exploitations of space by narrative. Please send your abstracts (300-500 words) to Gerald Prince (gprince@babel.ling.upenn.edu) by October 1, 2016. Papers will be due March 1, 2018.”